Posts Tagged ‘#OWS’

The 99.99% vs the 00.01% – which are you? Brilliant Guardian infographic video

Saturday, November 19th, 2011

Luxury brands like Louis Vuitton did record business this year, as did luxury car sales. This is the bottom line of our current economic system. Draw your own conclusions. But think twice before suggesting Occupiers don’t have clear demands or don’t know what they’re talking about. When someone says “Occupy Wall Street has no clear demands what I hear is “I hope no one is listening to those kids at Occupy Wall Street.”

Occupy Vancouver

Saturday, October 15th, 2011

Occupy Vancouver

The sign above bears a quote from philosopher Bertrand Russell: “Advocates of capitalism are very apt to appeal to the sacred principle of liberty, which can be embodied in one maxim, “the fortunate must not be restrained in their tyranny over the unfortunate”.”

Occupy Vancouver had a promising start on a warm, beautiful fall day. More than 5000 people came out, making it the largest Occupy gathering in Canada (or so we were told). The mood was peaceful but determined.

On Day 1 of Occupy Vancouver there was only brief mention that the Occupy movement actually began here. For those who don’t know, Occupy Wall Street was initiated by a twitter hashtag proposed by Adbusters magazine—#OccupyWallStreet—followed with the magazine’s now legendary poster of a serene ballerina on Wall Street’s bull market brass bull. The dancer is surrounded by runners in gas masks, and above her floats the question “What is our one demand?” The hashtag was almost certainly the spark that moved protestors to Zucotti Park.

Adbusters is a 22-year-old Vancouver publication. Greenpeace was also invented in Vancouver, which begs the question whether our main export, after raw logs of course, is resistance. The Vancouver Sun just ran another story on the Occupy movement’s Vancouver origin.

See pre-protest statements from Mayor of Vancouver (nervous after the recent hockey riot, though needlessly) and from the leader of the provincial opposition party, and some commentary from Rabble.ca. To read more about Occupy Wall Street, see the previous post which contains useful links. The full set of photos is here. The photo below was shot by Vancouver reporter Jennifer Palma from a hotel across the street.

Taken from a hotel next to the Vancouver Art Gallery (formerly the Vancouver Courthouse)

Donald Sutherland

Above, Donald Sutherland at Occupy Vancouver. Photo by Jazmin Miranda Photography. Click on photo for more info, and there’s another shot of him here.

Occupy Vancouver

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Above is an archival Vancouver photo courtesty of a friend. “Before the days of internet and facebook, this is how social movements in Vancouver invited the broader public to meetings in the 1930′s…”

Below is my Uncle Bob, who (to my amazement) was first on the speaker list. I had no idea he was planning to do this. And he was brilliant! See his speech here (shaky picture, sorry).

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver - tent

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Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver - Guy Fawkes on Howe Street

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

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Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

Occupy Vancouver

“DON’T LET THEM TELL YOU IT CAN’T BE DONE”

Update – final thought by Sean Orr at Scout Magazine:

“And speaking of City Caucus, it – like The Province – is concerned that Occupy Vancouver has cost the city more than $500,000 since it began last Saturday. While they conveniently don’t mention oh, say the cost of each Canucks Game/UFC fight/Fireworks, the real irony is that, as free-market fundamentalists they’re the ones who write off expenditures like social and environmental costs as externalities. If there was any sense to things, this protest would be marked in black ink and not red. Instead, because the Occupy campers aren’t “moving units” that contribute to the economy, they are an inefficiency. You know, like childbirth.”

You Know Things are Messed Up When Librarians Start Marching

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

Most of the photos here were taken by a friend of mine, Canadian filmmaker Velcrow Ripper, at Occupy Wall Street. Reproduced here with permission. See his whole gallery of Occupy Wall Street photos.

I would like to nominate the protest sign—all the protest signs of this year’s worldwide uprisings, in general—as the pre-eminent design object of 2011. Most newsworthy, most useful, most creative, and it gives “mass-produced” a new meaning.

Vancouver begins its own Occupy protest on October 15, in solidarity as well as in protest against the wealth divide here at home. The gap between rich and poor in Canada is at its historic widest, and it’s nowhere wider than in British Columbia where more than a decade of rightwing policies and cuts have produced, among other tragedies, the worst child poverty rate in the country, and by a wide margin. Accelerating corporate ownership of our political process creates problems here too. Even if Canada’s greater regulation of banking has saved us from some of the catastrophes facing the US, the rapidly widening income gap means we are heading for trouble.

Those who mock or dismiss Occupy Wall Street—if anyone is still doing that—will probably regret it later.

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.”
- Mahatma Gandhi

More reading:

Mark Ruffalo, The Guardian: We are the 99 percent
Paul Krugman, New York Times, Panic of the Plutocrats
Naomi Klein, The Nation, Occupy Wall Street: The Most Important Thing in the World Now
Chris Hedges, Truthdig, Why the Elites are in Trouble
Douglas Rushkoff, CNN, Think Occupy Wall St. is a phase? You don’t get it
Tristan Markle, The Mainlander, #OccupyVancouver? Look to Hong Kong housing activists for inspiration
Joe Romm, ThinkProgress, The Other 99% of Us Can’t Buy Our Way Out of the Impending Global Ponzi Scheme Collapse

Below, by an unknown phographer, a shot of a US veteran at the protest. (Please tell me if you know who shot this.) Sign should win a prize for best ever use of black electrical tape. “2nd time I’ve fought for my country – 1st time I’ve known my enemy.”

And from CNN‘s article ”Think Occupy Wall St. is a phase? You don’t get it”:

Update: a new photo of the sign at top, which now seems to be going viral: