Archive for the ‘fashion’ Category

The Hitler Youth haircut

Monday, May 26th, 2014

hipster and nazi hairstyle

Google Hitler Youth haircut. You get “About 50,300 results” and most of the hits are articles about the contemporary version of the Hitler Youth undercut hairstyle.

look at this fucking hipster

The abrupt turn to the right in yesterday’s European Parliament elections, including massive gains for the far-right anti-immigration National Front in France, the anti-immigration and racist UKIP in the UK. and a far right party in Denmark (among many others) seems to signal what we’re headed for. Then there’s the right-wing nationalist Navendra Modi’s win in India, military coups popping up in other places…

I know I’m not alone in finding this haircut and all its variants chilling.

hitler youth haircut then & now

hipster haircut

hitler youth haircut - poster

Hitler Youth haircut brownshirt

hitler youth haircut

For fun, the overgroomed douche variant:

hitler haircut douche version

Then there’s the other shaved-sides dictator style, the Kim Jong Un. Supposedly this cut is now mandatory for all males in North Korea (and, apparently, for males in my own social circle):

kim jong un mandatory haircut

Kim Jong Un haircut

See also:

How to ask for a Hitler Youth Haircut

Every Dude You Know Is Getting This Haircut

The 20 Most Controversial Men’s Style Trends of the Past 20 Years

Comeback of the Hitler Youth haircut worries Jewish and progressive groups fearing intolerance

or search Hitler youth haircut on Tumblr – here’s a journalism student saying “I got the Hitler Youth haircut I always wanted”

hitler youth haircut

hitleryouthhaircuttumblr

PS Thanks to Spain, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Slovakia, and Romania for going left in the EU elections.

Next in this series: more trendy male styles from other specifically conservative decades

 

Arhuaca mochila bags of Colombia

Sunday, April 13th, 2014

IMG_5388mochillaxx

I first saw these cylindrical handwoven bags in Medellín, Colombia, worn by a couple of delegates at the UN World Urban Forum. I noticed them because they looked unusually sturdy, very finely handwoven in wool, and beautifully patterned. After I arrived in Bogotá I realized they are actually common. They’re called mochilas and are a traditional artisanal bag made by the Arhuaca people in Colombia’s Sierra Nevada de Maria mountain range. Traditionally they were made either from agave fibre, hemp or wild cotton, thought after the arrival of the Spanish they were also made from various wools. You can  also see synthetic fibres used (see top left in photo below) as well as disappointing mass-produced versions. Traditionally the patterns indicated families via their totemic animals, often very abstracted.

“Starting in the 1960s, the arhuaca mochila left the geographical arhuaco, penetrated large Colombian cities (especially Santa Marta, Valledupar and Barranquilla), and is used primarily by young people today as a way to claim their indigenous culture. In 2006, the backpack was nominated as the Arhuaco cultural symbol of Colombia in the contest organized by the magazine Semana.” It now seems that the bag has more generally become a symbol of Colombia and have been adopted by a wide range of people dressed in varying degrees of casualness. More here.

It felt a little weird to be following people around and stealthily photographing their bags.

These bags are not cheap in Bogotá, by the way. They’re cheaper in towns where they are made such as Santa Clara, but frankly they shouldn’t be. As with most weaving, it takes an enormous amount of labour to make a single bag and the weavers should be paid appropriately.

The bag I bought is the minimalist white one at right in the very last photo.

Textile museum, Bogota

Mochila bags, Bogotá Mochilas arhuacas - via Wikipedia Photo above via Wikimedia Commons Arhuaca mochila bags of Colombia IMG_5420mochillax Mochila bag, Colombia The one above is particularly beautiful. Mochila bag, Colombia Mochila bag, Colombia Mochila bag, colombia Mochila bag, Colombia Mochila bag, Colombia

Bogotá - mochila

Mochila bag, Colombia Mochila bag, Colombia Mochila bag, Colombia Mochila bag, Colombia

This one is a bag in a different style and from jute:

Mochila type bag, but of jute

Bogotá - Arhuaca mochila bags

mochila (& UN Habitat bag)

mochila

mochila

mochila

Bogotá - mochila, Cafe Color

Bogotá - Arhuaca mochila

Bogotá - men with mochila

Bogotá - mochila

 

Secos & Molhados – Sangue Latino

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

Secos & Molhados

Oh 1973, I am so happy to see you yet again. Last week it was Sensations Fix, and then yesterday someone posted Sangue Latino by Secos & Molhados. I hadn’t heard it in years. Brazil does glam folk rock. So very beautiful.

 Secos & Molhados - Sangue Latino

Gulabi gang

Tuesday, January 8th, 2013

India gang of vigilante women punishing abusers

India’s Gulabi gang in beautiful pink. Gulabi means “rose” in rose.”

“The Gulabi gang is a group of women vigilantes active across North India. It is named after the pink saris worn by its members. The group was founded as a response to widespread domestic abuse and other violence against women. Gulabis visit abusive husbands and beat them with bamboo sticks. In 2008, they stormed an electricity office and forced officials to restore the power they had cut to extract bribes. The Gulabis have also stopped child marriages and protested dowry and female illiteracy.”

3D printing

Saturday, December 8th, 2012

Above is the Eiffel Tower 3D-printed shoe by Continuum via Architizer. Below, 3D printed working models of Theo Jansen’s beachwalking strandbeests. I bought these for my nephews and am still trying to figure out how to assemble and attach the propellors. The main animal is printed in one piece, and yet its moving parts work perfectly. Watch Stephen Fry play with his here. Printed in New York by 3D printing house Shapeways. It’s interesting how many 3D printed objects have a sort of lattice structure, probably dictated by cost of material and laser use. And how many of the objects are miniatures.

Theo Jansen's strandbeest in miniature

Stephen Fry demonstrating it at 38:45:

Moustaches off, please

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

zookeeper in the zooniverse

Unless you’re Howard Moon, zookeeper in the zooniverse, please take the moustache off. Or grow a beard to match. Movember is over; it’s December now.

Unless you’d like women everywhere to grow body hair all over until January. Thank you. I am near tears over this.